Random Acts of Kindness – beautiful video!

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Natural Remedies for Receding Gums

Receding gums is often one of the first signs that warn you of gum disease. When gums start receding, they create a space between your teeth and the gums and this will cause bacteria to enter the gums and start damaging the tissues.

Many reasons like poor dental hygiene,periodontal disease, heredity, hormone imbalances and aggressive brushing of the teeth are some reasons associated with this condition. Receding gums need not always be treated in a dentist’s office. There are some natural remedies that can be used at home in order to control the deterioration of the gums and teeth.

Natural Remedies For Receding Gums

Green Tea

Rich in antioxidants, green tea is known as the elixir of health and can be used for treating and preventing the onset of a number of diseases. Taking green tea will help in reducing the damage caused to the teeth as a result of receding gums. Green tea reduces inflammation of the gums and also helps in destroying the bacteria in the mouth that can cause periodontal problems. Take a cup of green tea in the morning to keep your gums and teeth strong.

Sesame Oil

Sesame oil can be used in the same manner as a mouthwash for removing toxic substances and plaque buildup in the gums, which too can cause the gums to recede.

Take a quarter cup of sesame oil and swish your mouth thoroughly with this. Warming the oil slightly can help as it can help in better absorption and removal of toxins and plaque. The oil will also give a protective coating to your gums and teeth and prevent recession of gums and dental decay.

Aloe Vera

Aloe is an anti-inflammatory and anti bacterial agent. Take the fresh gel from the aloe plant and use this for brushing your teeth. You can also use aloe gel as a mouthwash every day morning and after meals to protect your teeth and gums from decay and prevent receding of gums. Aloe also helps in healing of damaged gums and infections.

Coconut Oil

Being antimicrobial in nature, coconut oil too is a great remedy for treating receding gums and the cause behind it. Take some virgin coconut oil and swish your mouth with it after brushing your teeth.

This will give your teeth the necessary cover for protection against disease causing bacteria and germs and also prevent food particles and germs from sticking between and on the teeth and causing decay. Coconut oil can be used every day as a prevention method for receding gums and also for general oral hygiene.

Lemon Oil

Lemon has mild antiseptic qualities and is also an excellent antibacterial agent. However, direct application of lemon every day is not recommended as it can corrode the enamel.Lemon oil can be acquired or prepared at home by infusing olive oil with lemon for a few weeks.

This oil can be used for swishing your mouth first thing in the morning. Lemon oil helps in killing all the bacteria and prevents gum recession and tooth decay as well. Lemon also stimulates tissue formation and can encourage new tissues to grow in the place of damaged ones.

Eucalyptus

This strong essential oil helps in killing all the germs in the mouth and prevents tooth decay and gum diseases that lead to receding gums. Eucalyptus is also anti inflammatory in nature and helps in reducing swollen gums as well. Take some eucalyptus oil and dilute with water.Massage for a few minutes onto your gums every day and rinse off. This will stimulate new tissue growth and also reduce gum recession and damage due to bacterial action.

Clove

The action of cloves on decayed and damaged tooth and infection has been long praised. Clove oil is known to be a natural antiseptic, antimicrobial and anti fungal agent and helps in stimulating the growth and repair of damaged tissues. Cloves are very powerful as disinfectants and can stop bacterial action with frequent use. Use a clove every day or massage with clove oil for best results.

Myrrh

kind of resin that is obtained from trees, myrrh can be used for stopping the recession of gums and preventing root exposure and damage as well. It is also great for strengthening the gums. Myrrh can be used for rinsing the mouth or as a tooth powder or paste, whichever is convenient for you.

Tea Tree Oil

Tea tree oil can be diluted and used for swishing the mouth for preventing gum recession and root damage. Remember that the oil is very strong and should not be used without diluting it, lest it should cause burns. Tea tree oil is a powerful anti fungal and microbial agent anddestroys the bacteria and plaque buildup in the teeth and between the gums.

Also Read

Natural Cure For Receding Gums
Home Remedies For Sensitive Teeth

Sumac Tree

Sumac tree is known to have stringent qualities that can come of help for treating of receding gums. It helps in stimulation of the gums and also cleans the teeth, keeping them safe from decay and damage. Take a twig and peel the outer bark. Gently rub the inner partover the surface of the teeth and along the gums.

Yarrow

Wild yarrow too has several antiseptic and astringent qualities. The flower or the leaves of wild yarrow can be used for rubbing over your teeth and preventing gum recession to a great extent.

Sage Leaves

The leaves act as a tonic for the gums and are also an excellent treatment for the mucus membrane. Sage leaves can be directly rubbed on the gums and teeth for protection andtreatment of receding gums. Sage leaves can be used for making a tea as well for preparing a rinse for your gums. Add sage leaves to a cup of boiling water and steep for ten minutes before using it for rinsing.

Rose Vinegar

Rose vinegar helps in strengthening the gums and can be used as a rinse for the mouth. For making rose vinegar, take 3 ounces of rose petals and soak in red wine vinegar solution. Steep for about seven days and strain it. A tablespoon of rose vinegar can be added to one cup of warm water and this can be used as a mouth rinse every day to prevent recession of gums.

7 Reasons Mushrooms Could Save the World

by Kristina Chew

Perhaps you only think about mushrooms when one sprouts up in your yard or when you’re ordering a pizza. But they have uses far, far beyond the kitchen:

1) An alternative to styrofoam packaging

Mushroom fibers can be used as an eco-friendly alternative to polystyrene, the synthetic (and potentially carcinogenic) polymer most of us encounter as styrofoam. An upstate New York company, Evocative Design, literally grows its product from corn stalks and vegetable husks injected with mushroom spores; the fibers are grown in molds and then baked in an oven so they have the right texture, hardness and elasticity.

Evocative Design recently made a deal with Sealed Air, a huge packaging wrap (think bubble wrap) company, to build factories that will make Restore Mushroom Packaging. One day, your purchases could arrive not packed in “peanuts” but in actual, biodegradable, mushroom fibers.

 

2) Oil, diesel and other petrochemical spill clean-up

Mycologist and researcher Paul Stamets was contacted by the EPA after the Deepwater Horizon spill to learn about how mushrooms could be used to clean up petrochemicals via a process called mycoremediation, in which toxic compounds are reduced into harmless ones by fungi. The EPA did not actually use his mushrooms but Stamets has carried on with research should future spills occur, developing strains of oyster mushrooms that can tolerate ocean salinity and metabolize oil that is floating on the surface of the sea.

3) A substitute for chemical fertilizers

Stamets’ company, Fungi Perfecti, also produces what he says is an alternative to fertilizer, Mycogrow. According to some organic farmers, Mycogrow fertilizes plants without causing pollution, says Alternet.

Swiss scientists have  found that plants and certain kinds of mushrooms, mycorrhizal fungi, form symbiotic relationships. The fungi acquire nutrients (including, in particular, phosphate) and are therefore able to “act as an extension of plants’ root systems, drastically reducing the need for phosphate fertilizers.”

4) An eco-way to clean up farm waste

In addition, mushrooms could help clean up farm waste: Sacks of mycelia (the vegetative part of a fungus that look like a mass of branching threads) can also be used to filter out toxins and bacteria, says Stamets.

5) A fungal insecticide

Pesticides based on fungi can replace the chemicals currently (and widely) used to kill ants and termites. Some mushrooms and toadstools have been found to contain compounds that, if isolated, could be used in developing insecticides.

6) Garbage disposal

We’re talking garbage on a massive, landfill-size scale: Certain types of mushrooms can break down 90 percent of the materials in dirty diapers in two months. Those diaper-eating fungi would be oyster mushrooms, which can grow on dead trees as they eat cellulose, the main component of disposable diapers.

7) A way to overcome the fear of death

That’s a tall order for a small fungus to fullfil.

Before anyone was worrying about eco-friendly packaging and pesticides, people have been turning to psilocybin mushroom — “magic mushrooms” — for their “transformative” (hallucinogenic) effects. Scientists at Johns Hopkins University say that the psychedelic drug in the mushrooms “reliably induce[d] transcendental experiences in volunteers, which offered long-lasting psychological growth and helped people find peace in their lives — without the negative effects.”

Scientists are trying to find the “sweet spot” that would enable people taking psylocybin to, as Roland Griffiths, professor of behavioral biology, says “optimize the positive persistent effects and avoid some of the fear and anxiety that can occur [when taking the mushrooms].” Ultimately, Griffiths and the other researchers are seeking to find out whether such psychedelic experiences could help people recover from addiction and deal with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

I guess we shouldn’t be surprised if, one day, mushrooms inherit the earth?

 

 

 

The Art of Receiving

by 

Everything in the universe is made from energy— subatomic particles. Including this page. The subatomic world of energy creates the home you live in, the car you drive and the clothes you’re wearing right now. Beneath the texture, design and color of your clothing is another formation of subatomic particles—the human body. Your body pulsates with energy. With every breath, your body moves vast amounts of blood to your heart while cleansing carbon dioxide from your lungs. Your body is powered by millions of cellular energetic contacts, which need energy to maintain health or allow for healing.

The fourth chakra receives the highest amount of energy, in the form of abundance, for the human body. Reception occurs at the back mate of the chakra, right in-between your shoulder blades. When this chakra is open—its normal state—and allows energy in, it receives health, love, joy and wealth. Many people refuse to receive, and energetically block this chakra, withholding deserved abundance and healing.

Some people leak their vital life force from this chakra. The leaking, which is generally subconscious, can devastate the anatomical structures in the chest: heart, lungs, breast tissue, thymus gland, lymph fluid, and blood vessels. It’s very important for all of us to realize that we’re worthy of energy and an abundant life—even if others around us do not allow this for themselves.

Thoughts and feelings are energy, too. If our thoughts are consumed by worries and concerns then that is the type of energy that will run through our bodies. Only by adopting a new philosophy that lets us see the beauty in each moment, rather than the suffering, will we be able to stop leaking our own precious energy and ultimately learn how to receive energy—the real job of the fourth chakra.

Empathic individuals, those who can feel the feelings of others, seem to have the most difficulty receiving or maintaining their life force energy. Yet, it is these individuals, with extraordinary compassionate hearts, who are drawn to healing professions. When we leak energy or are unable to receive it, we hope that someone less fortunate will use it instead.  However, very few individuals understand the emotional and mental mechanics of allowing universal life force energy into the body. What we don’t receive hangs out in the ethers unused.

Empathy is a gift that will lead us to feed, clothe, and support our world in ways we have yet to imagine. The challenge of being empathic is to become comfortable with the feelings of others—even when others are sad, lonely, or distressed – while remaining dedicated to the health and wellbeing of their emotions and life first. It takes energy to give, and it takes energy to refuse the kindness and giving nature of others. When we allow our beings and souls to be fed by the world around us, then and only then can we give.

Exercises to Practice the Art of Receiving

Balancing the Fourth Chakra and Stopping any Leaking

Use several fingers to gently tap your mid-sternum for one minute. This reduces or stops any energetic leaking from the fourth chakra while activating the thymus gland, which plays an important role in balancing our immune system, increasing energy levels, and improving blood circulation (if your stress is highly elevated, tap for several minutes).

Receiving Energy

The back of the fourth chakra is between the shoulder blades. This area of the body has the highest receptivity to energy. To balance the heart chakra, visualize or feel energy moving into your back at least five times a day. For example, you could visualize a large flock of birds flying into your back; hear or feel warm rain moving into your back; or hear a wonderful melody vibrating and filling up the heart chakra.

A great way to practice receiving love is to stand in the shower with your back facing the spray of water.

People who can most benefit from this exercise often tend to forget to do it. A great way to remember is to pay attention when others acknowledge you in a positive way— perhaps when someone says, “Thank you!” or “Have a great day!” Let these moments of kindness remind you to receive through the heart chakra.

Once you get the hang of this exercise, it’s important to feel the act of receiving, which can often be an enormously moving experience.

 

War on Gardening / Freedom to Garden

Lately I’ve been reading many articles on the subject of home gardens and laws against it. It’s time to change these ridiculous laws! Does it make sense to you to cover your lawn with chemicals and waste so much water just so you can have a greener lawn than your neighbors, or grow vegetables and help your family as well as save money? Of course, if you want a green lawn that is certainly OK, but what if I want to garden in my yard? Shouldn’t that be my choice? I say YES!

Here is one article on the subject:

Cities Continue to Demonize Vegetable Gardens

From 2008 to 2009, home gardening increased from 36 million to 43 million households. It appears to be continuing its upward trend. As Mother Earth News puts it, “The worse the economy, the more people garden.”

Although vegetable gardening is good news for people’s pocketbooks as well as their stomachs, it has created an interesting problem between some city officials and the local gardeners. In what has been dubbed a War on Gardening, many green thumbs across the nation are having to deal with officials who are none-too-impressed with their edible plants.

The trouble occurs when gardeners turn to unconventional places to plant their produce, usually in the front yard. One organization, Food Not Lawns, is devoted to helping gardeners rip up their useless ornamental lawns in favor of growing something you can eat.

The garden starts out innocently enough, in most cases. Usually, the gardens under dispute are very well-maintained and give the appearance of order and organization. However, someone soon calls the city with a complaint. City workers then look up their land development code and issue a citation.

It’s there that the situation gets dicey. The gardener can either comply with the city or face an array of fines, watch as the garden gets cleared by the city, or be confronted with even jail time for their actions.

The most famous case of this concerned Julie Bass, who faced up to 93 days in jail for not removing her front-yard vegetable garden. But gardeners from Orlando to Oklahoma are stirring up an unlikely movement challenging the authorities and calling for others to preserve their right to garden.

One gardener we spoke to related a problem he had with the city of Las Vegas. “[My] garden contained assorted vegetables like beets, spinach, broccoli, cauliflower, [and] grape vines in a Pennsylvania topsoil retention method.”

His garden was covered with Bermuda grass to conserve topsoil and water. It was this that officials took offense at, and they wrote him a citation.

“The citation stated “Overgrown area, in need of cutting. Time limit and fine if failed to comply.”

He sent a reply stating that he did not live in a fenced in homeowners association area, and that the inspector did not know the difference between weeds and vegetables. “Two weeks later I received an apology from our city councilman,” he told us.

The question of whether gardeners should be allowed to use their front lawns as plant beds affects more than you may think at first glance. Those against them see them as a threat to property values, a plight on the aesthetics of a neighborhood.

Is there more behind anti-gardeners’ thinking, however? The woman charged with a misdemeanor and threat of jail was told that her garden was not “suitable” for a front yard, with one city official saying that suitable meant “common.” Since ornamental lawns today usually include bermuda grass, a couple of deciduous trees, and perhaps a small row of flowers, that is what everyone should do, the thinking goes. The question then becomes less about personal freedom and more about why we constantly try to define what is normal and acceptable in society.

Perhaps soon officials will realize that organic vegetable gardening is a good thing, and it is here to stay. Until then, there will probably be many more cases of the war on gardening taking place in America.

Also see  Todmorden: The Incredible Edible Town